Tag:Newspaper

North Aurora, IL - December 11, 2013: Driving instructor Anne Hegberg helps her client, 80-year-old JoAnn Mantzke, to the car before a lesson. CREDIT: John Gress for The New York Times

An Alternative to Giving Up the Car Keys

In the United States, about 35 million licensed drivers are over 65, an increase of 20 percent since 2003, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

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Chicago Magazine Food Photographer: corn pops

Chicago Magazine Food Photographer: Kellogg’s Corn Pops

When I was photographing chef Jared Wentworth, I told him this was the most beautiful dish I have photographed all year… my apologies to all the other chefs who have posed for me in the past twelve months.

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John Gress for The New York Times Dan Brown, inventor of the Bionic Wrench, is defending his patent rights against the Max Axess, made in China.

American wrench fights Chinese knockoff

Last Christmas, Sears had a brisk seller in the Bionic Wrench, an award-winning, patented tool with spiffy lime green accents. This holiday season, though, Sears has a special display for its own wrench, in the red and black colors of its house brand, Craftsman.

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Chicago Magazine Food Photography of BBQ

Chicago Magazine Food Photography: Not your average BBQ

Just how serious is America’s java addiction? According to the National Coffee Association, 64 percent of the population ages 18 and older consume at least one cup daily, up from 58 percent in 2011 and 56 percent the year before. But why relegate such impressive consumption to mugs in the morning? Chef Brendan Neville of Chicago’s Bite Café uses it to make his homemade barbecue sauce.

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Peanut butter isnt just for sandwiches

“Most people think peanut butter, they think jelly,” Brian Huston, chef de cuisine at Chicago’s The Publican, told The Daily. And why not? According to the National Peanut Board, the average child scarfs down 1,500 PB&Js before he or she graduates high school. But should the gooey goodness — consumed by 90 percent of American households — be exiled solely to the land of brown-bag cafeteria lunch swaps? Huston doesn’t think so; he likes to add it as a thickener to his salad dressings. “It’s like using buttermilk,” he explained, “but with that salty, peanut buttery taste.” As for the age-old crunchy vs. creamy debate, Huston still wrestles with his inner-child: “For the dressing… creamy. But if I were still in school and someone made me a sandwich, I’d go crunchy.”

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